Japanese Covered Bridge (known as Cau Chua Pagoda) is one of the emblematic destinations of Hoi An. Built in the early 17th century, Japanese Covered Bridge is a wonderful masterpiece of Japanese community, connecting Tran Phu street and Nguyen Thi Minh Khai street.

Japanese Covered Bridge

Japanese Covered Bridge

The beautiful little bridge of 60 feet in length was first conducted for locals pray to stave off earthquakes. The bridge features a roof as a shelter from both rain and sun, and two sculptures of two dogs and two monkeys representing the years that many of Japan’s emperors were born in. Additionally, it is said that the bridge was built in the dog year and was completed in the monkey year. On the main door of Cau Chua pagoda, there are three carved words “Lai Vien Kieu” – literally means “Bridge for passengers by from Afar”. On the slope of bridge, a small temple worships the God Bac De Tran Vu who controls weather changes, according to Chinese beliefs. It is said that the origin of the bridge is about the legend of a monster called “Cu monster” whose head lies in India, its body in Vietnam and its tail in Japan. Locals believed its movements causes earthquakes, floods in these countries, so the bridge is regarded as a sword stabbed into the back of the monster, which limits the disasters it causes.

Architecture at Japanese Covered Bridge

Architecture at Japanese Covered Bridge

Japanese Covered Bridge is an iconic attraction of Hoi An. Tourists can visit a beautiful historical piece of Japanese architecture at any time of day, buy plenty of paintings by artists in the bridge as well for their trips.